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Archive for the ‘Research’ category

What are the most important articles in Wikipedia?

Wikipedia has 4,362,397 articles in English.  But how many of those are seriously encyclopedic, and what are the most important articles? We’ve been looking closely at Wikipedia for an upcoming app. We wanted to know the most important articles. We calculated an importance score for every article, based on how richly linked a Wikipedia article is […]


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Mapping the world of cultural metadata standards

Metadata is a the glue that makes information useful. It is data about data. It could be a title, location, and camera settings for a photo; the history of a painting; the materials in a museum object; the authors of a journal article; or the time, date, and location of photo of a butterfly for a […]


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Smartphones widely integrated into our lives (graphs)

Smartphones (e.g., the iPhone or Android) are commonplace, and education outreach projects need make use of this reality. People use their smartphones while doing all kinds of things. For example: (Left to right, top:  while waiting in line, socializing, in the bathroom, while watching TV; bottom: while using a computer, playing video games, reading a […]


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Most visited art exhibitions in 2010 (graph)

The following were the twenty most visited art exhibitions of 2010:


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Framing art and science in terms of national security

National security is a useful angle for presenting science, art and culture issues to disengaged or skeptical audiences. Like any hook, such as sports or popular culture, military and national security themes broaden an audience for outreach. There are over 3.6M military personnel in the U.S., 1.9M spouses & kids of active duty members, and over […]


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Institutions don’t support digital humanities tools, says DHQ report

The growing field of digital humanities is hampered by a lack of motivation to share tools, and a lack of direct rewards from the academic establishment, says a new study published last month in the Digital Humanities Quarterly. Digital humanities uses computers as part of research in arts and humanities. Computers are useless in isolation; they […]


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More people digitally involved in arts & culture, says NEA

Computers and the internet are an increasingly important way that Americans engage in the arts, says a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts. The first bar in the chart below is people consuming recorded or broadcast content:


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Microconsignment vs. microlending + social business in 3rd world

Tina Rosenberg wrote in a blog post for the NYTimes last week, about microconsignment, which is.. A way for village entrepreneurs to sell innovative and important products for which there is no established market — such as solar lamps, water purifiers, stoves and reading glasses — without having to take on debt.


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Study: Factors that improve online experiences

In 2008, IDEA conducted a study about online experiences. The report (download PDF here) outlines key findings from surveys that explored factors that drive online experience as expressed by the three different subject groups – nonprofit organizations and cities, web designers and firms, and the general public.


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Hard to teach? Need to engage your audience?

Enriching the learning experience with interactivity. Students become disengaged and learn less when information is presented passively, such as through lectures or static text. Although your web site may contain a wealth of educational information, the way the information is presented may not be engaging your visitors. When learners aren’t engaged, they don’t assimilate the […]


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